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Category Archives: 3. Business of Transportation

The Business of Convict Transportation: The Sale of Convicts in America

Note: This post is part of a series on Convict Transportation to the American colonies. Convict transportation was modeled after the indentured servant trade. Many of the merchants who traded in indentured servants also took up the convict trade, and convicts were often transported alongside indentured servants. Both kinds of servants were generally sold at […]

The Business of Convict Transportation: Jonathan Forward’s Successors

Note: This post is part of a series on Convict Transportation to the American colonies. Jonathan Forward served as the first Contractor for Transports to the Government from 1718 to 1739. He was succeeded by a tight network of convict transporters who dominated the industry up until the practice of shipping convicts to America ended. […]

The Business of Convict Transportation: The First Contractor for Transports to the Government

Note: This post is part of a series on Convict Transportation to the American colonies. Jonathan Forward, after being appointed “Contractor for Transports to the Government,” ran his new business out of his house on Fenchurch Street in Cheapside. He now deployed his fleet of slave and merchant ships–many of which he named after himself–to […]

The Business of Convict Transportation: Jonathan Forward

Note: This post is part of a series on Convict Transportation to the American colonies. After passage of the Transportation Act in 1718, the British government faced the problem of administering the transportation of convicts overseas. The House of Lords resisted acting on the proposal of William Thomson, the main author of the Transportation Act, […]

The Business of Convict Transportation: Maryland and Virginia

Note: This post is part of a series on Convict Transportation to the American colonies. If transported British convicts weren’t sent to Georgia, then where did they go? The vast majority of transported convicts were sent to Maryland and Virginia, with the remaining few going to Pennsylvania, South Carolina, and the West Indies. Between 1718 […]

The Business of Convict Transportation: “Weren’t the Convicts All Sent to Georgia?”

Note: This post is part of a series on Convict Transportation to the American colonies. When I first began my investigation of convict transportation to the American colonies, I fully expected my project to focus on Georgia, because I had a distinct memory from grade school of a map of colonial America with the words […]

The Business of Convict Transportation: Francis March and the Brief Experiment

Note: This post is part of a series on Convict Transportation to the American colonies. Before passage of the Transportation Act of 1718, the British government conducted an experiment by contracting out the transportation of some of its convicts to a West Indies merchant, Francis March. On December 7, 1716, March received a government contract […]

The Business of Convict Transportation: Overview

Note: This post is part of a series on Convict Transportation to the American colonies. Before passage of the Transportation Act in 1718, convict transportation was a haphazard process, mainly because convicts were generally responsible for making their own arrangements for leaving the country. After passage of the Act, convict transportation became an official business. […]