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Tag Archives: Convict Transportation

Jeremiah Swift, Convict and Child Murderer by Robert Barnes

Note: This week Early American Crime welcomes historian and genealogist Robert Barnes as a guest author. Even though Robert’s guest post is a first for him on this website, it is not the first time his work has appeared in this space, since his book, Colonial Families of Maryland: Bound and Determined to Succeed, served […]

EAC Podcast: Writing Bound with an Iron Chain

In this podcast, I talk about how I came up with the idea of writing my new book, Bound with an Iron Chain, and about my experience writing it. Book Update My book is slowly beginning to populate the various booksellers across the Web. Here is a list of websites from around the world where […]

Read All About It: Bound with an Iron Chain Hits Bestsellers Lists!

Within one week of being published, my new book, Bound with an Iron Chain: The Untold Story of How the British Transported 50,000 Convicts to Colonial America, has appeared on Amazon.com’s Bestsellers lists for books about Colonial American History and English History! If you enjoy reading about American history, English history, or crime history, then […]

Special Announcement: My New Book on Convict Transportation Is Now Available

My new book, Bound with an Iron Chain: The Untold Story of How the British Transported 50,000 Convicts to Colonial America, has just been published by Pickpocket Publishing and is available for purchase. I hope you enjoy reading it. Amazon.com: Paperback ($16.99) and Kindle ($4.99). Smashwords: All e-book formats ($4.99). The book will soon be […]

Special Announcement: A New Book by Anthony Vaver Will Be Published By Pickpocket Publishing

My new book, Bound with an Iron Chain: The Untold Story of How the British Transported 50,000 Convicts to Colonial America will be published by Pickpocket Publishing in the early summer of 2011. In the 18th century, thousands of British convicts were separated from their families, chained together in the hold of a ship, and […]

Early American Criminals: The Canadian Burglars

On Friday, December 4, 1789, William Mooney Fitzgerald and John Clark were scheduled to appear before the court in St. John, New Brunswick. They were to learn their sentence after being tried and found guilty of burglary the day before. That morning, Rev. Charles William Milton entered their prison cell and later wrote that […]

In the Media: EAC on the Radio

I was recently interviewed by Leonard Sipes about “Early American Crime in the Media” for D.C. Public Safety Radio, which presents audio programs on crime, criminal offenders, and the criminal justice system. The program lasts a half hour and covers the criminal justice system in colonial America, how crime was covered in early American newspapers, […]

In the Media: Anthony Lamb and William Linsey Follow-up

Read my article on Anthony Lamb, who was perhaps America’s most successful transported convict, in February’s issue of The Readex Report: “‘Human Serpents sent us by our Mother Country': The Transformation of Anthony Lamb, Transported Convict.” * * * J. L. Bell posted a follow-up to my recent article about the burglar William Linsey on […]

Early American Criminals: Joseph Cooper and Philadelphia’s Lime and Onion Burglar

In May 1744, Elizabeth Robinson was sentenced at the Old Bailey in London to transportation to the American colonies for her involvement in the theft of 104 China oranges from a warehouse. She was loaded onto the Justitia that same month and eventually landed in Virginia. She ended up in Maryland, where she reportedly continued […]

Convict Transportation to America: Epilogue

Note: This post is part of a series on Convict Transportation to the American colonies. Almost as soon as British convict transportation to America ended, Americans began to downplay the numbers and significance of convicts sent to the colonies. In 1786, Thomas Jefferson led the way by claiming, The Malefactors sent to America were not […]